Doing Voice Overs without a microphone

Just the title of this article sounds impossible, right? That is because it should be impossible, but like anything I’ve found a way around the issue. See my Blue Snowball no longer functions so no VO. Thankfully Blue will replace it for free. So how am I going to keep doing Voice Overs with out a microphone? Simple. When you are auditioning you can send in your demo or previous recorded samples that match the job; if you have a voice over to record there is still a way to record it. Do you have a cell phone? Do you have Adobe SoundBooth? Do you have a pair of really good headphones? If you have all three of those you are good to go. What I would do is place my cell phone in a position like a microphone with the cell phone microphone faced towards me and then record it. Or you can just use it like a phone, hold it to your ear and record your script via the microphone feature.

I have a pretty good phone. An iPhone 4. It has pretty darn good sound quality and cleaning up a track to sound professional shouldn’t be that hard with Adobe SoundBooth on my side. I will have my microphone fixed soon, but for anyone who is in a similar situation just do what I suggested. I have yet to try this, but I am pretty sure it will go well. I will update this blog post or write a new article explaining how everything goes.

Voice Over Actor survival guide

When you are in the business of Voice Overs you never know when you will be auditioning. You could be eating dinner, get an email from a job saying you got a part we need this recorded and sent to us in an hour.  Since this is the case you need to  make sure your voice is in the right condition to record a Voice Over at all times that is why I’ve written some tips to help you out.

Tip Number one: If you auditioned for a part and are hoping for a callback or are on break from an audition, don’t drink milk! Milk is like Voice Over doomsday. It makes your voice sound yucky to put it mildly. I recommend to always have a bottle of water on you at all times. I stick with water, even though you can drink a lot of juices that won’t mess up your Voice Over voice.

Tip Number two:
Have you ever performed a theater play and had butterflies in your stomach the night of the first performance? While “butterflies” or nervousness is a natural reflex for the human body when performing you can’t let even the tiniest hint of it resonate in your voice, because the Microphone will pick it up and you won’t get the part. Instead of being nervous think about where you are, who you are, who you are talking too, why you are talking to them, what your motivation is, are you supposed to be a  dog or sound emotionless? These are all things you should know when you walk into the Voice Over booth or even your own Home Recording studio. How can these help you from being nervous? You are occupying your mind by thinking through your performance, which in turn makes you less nervous because you feel more prepared. If that doesn’t help you read my third tip.

Tip Number three:
The Microphone is your friend. When you talk to your friend he or she can tell when you are lying or nervous. So can the Microphone. Your friend can also tell when you are happy, sad, angry, upset, excited, tired, or any other emotion. So can the Microphone.

Every Microphone you use is truly your best friend in Voice Overs, because not only does it know your voice inside and out it is a visual aid that can help you replace that it is a microphone in your mind and think about a real friend you have and pretend the microphone is that person. You aren’t going to be nervous talking to your best friend are you? I’d hope not.

tip four:
I’ve read on twitter and met  people who are scared of their script. What is so scary about your script? Did it grow eyes and legs and try to attack you? NO, because it is only a piece of paper. It can’t harm you, you are only harming yourself by being afraid of it.
tip five:

Put your all into the Voice Over you are recording, but don’t record a Voice Over that is uncomfortable for your voice, because you are hurting your voice and you have a higher chance of booking that job. It is not worth ruining your voice just to book one job. You may think “this is a small role it won’t hurt if I do this raspy voice that hurts.” Small roles can turn into big roles, actually I would say in at least every show I’ve watched one minor character has become a main character or at least a character whose voice is heard every couple episodes.

Okay, so good luck and say hi to your friend mic. I will be writing plenty of more entries, so stay tuned.

If you need any extra Voice Overs  please  visit my site and listen to some of my samples. You can always leave a message or chat with me live via my site!
www.ryansatterfield.com