Bitcoin predictions — 1 BTC $300 or below by mid August 2014

A lot of people believe bitcoin is unpredictable, but most people don’t analyze bitcoin. I firmly believe it will be at $300 per bitcoin by mid-august 2014 or below that mark. $300 is a very liberal number, meaning based on the data available, I believe it should be below $300 by mid-august.

What bitcoin data are you using?

I know my prediction sounds crazy, but here is how I’ve come to this conclusion. August 1st, 2013 bitcoin was worth $97 and as of today it is worth $569. That seems like a huge jump and that things should keep going up, but the chart at coinbase begs to differ. Bitcoin hit a peak of $1,113 per bitcoin on December 1st, but ever since then it has been going downhill with occasional small spikes that are to be expected in any market. We are currently on one of those spikes, which is why one bitcoin is worth $569 dollars right now, but you can tell that this spike shouldn’t last long, since it has already dipped from being worth $600 and continues to go downwards. If you look over the entire market, you’ll see this pattern is very common.

Some companies have announced that they plan to accept bitcoin, like Dish, but they have not started accepting bitcoin yet. Also, it is important to ask yourself, how many people will pay their dish bill with bitcoin? Most likely not enough to cause a huge spike in the market, at least not by mid August 2014.

So, if you’re upset that bitcoin didn’t go up like you expected in mid- August 2014, just read my prediction. If I am wrong, then I am wrong. Bitcoin is fickle, but based on the data currently available it should go downwards, not upwards.

Doing Voice Overs For Podcasts

Doing voice overs for podcasts is entirely different than doing voice overs for animation. I would know, since I do both. I am still available to hire my voice overs for animation, but I am also on a podcast. I don’t get paid for doing the podcast, but it is still fun.

what’s the difference between voice overs for animation and a podcast

In Animation you have to bring a character to life, yet in a podcast you have to bring the topic to life. Bringing a topic to life can be more of a challenge than a character, so it really helps improve your voice over skills. What is really cool about doing a podcast after doing animated voices is that you can throw in a silly voice once in awhile to get people’s attention. Animation and podcasting are entirely different in some aspects, but you still are bringing something to life. Sure, most podcasts don’t bring a mutant bacon super hero to life, in fact I’ve never heard of one that has… but that doesn’t mean they aren’t cool. I’ll write more about Voice overs in the near future.

Is twitter promoting better grammar?

While I usually write about my voice over work, today I was inspired by Dan_ODay who said “A word never to allow in your radio commercial copy: “Amenities.” No real person ever uses that word.” now while this tweet seems random, it isn’t. This is one example of professional voice over advice you’ll see with very good grammar.

Almost all the people I follow are professional Voice over talent or onscreen actors. I rarely see a stereotype tweet that looks like “C u 2 night”, actually I’ve never seen a tweet written by someone who is professional like that.

I honestly only see those type of tweets from the Justin bieber fan base age group. This is most likely because they are in school or just using twitter really quickly to say how much they love bieber or to ask a friend something while in class, which frankly I don’t have a problem with. If you need to check on something & it takes you two seconds to send during class, I don’t think it should be an issue, but schools and even esome college professors do.

Why can’t Voice Over Actors handle feedback? This is a business!

People have asked me to critique their voice over demos, yet when I do they defend their mistakes instead of improving them.
I am nice with my feedback, I tell the person exactly what I hear & when I hear someone not fit for doing a certain type of voice, I tell them. when people contact me and tell me to use my connections to get them gigs & I’ve only seen their name online, well that’s annoying. I can refer them to people, sure. But even when I do that I get the “I don’t want to spend money for a good demo” to improve my career response. I can’t tell you how many times this has happened or why some of these people are trying to get into voice overs, all I know is that they can’t take feedback…. And I don’t know why. I also don’t know why so many voice talent ask me to listen to their demo. I am not a casting director, I’ve always thought they wanted a second opinion, but instead people are arguing that they don’t need to work on anything & for me to get them a job (in a nutshell). Can someone please explain the psychology of this to me?? I don’t get it. I understand CDs dealing with this, but talent? Really? Why?

Voice Over talent in Backstage.com who got the part.

Backstage has a section every week for actors and actoresses who “Got the part” in an on screen acting part. Well, after being in the music video “Hey 14″ as an extra I wrote to them, they wrote back, I wrote back, a couple months went by and then they interviewed me. That was cool. I didn’t have a script in front of me like I do when I am doing my voice over art. I am used to a script, so I know what type of emotion and words to say… but in an interview you don’t have a script. The article was printed and it is great. I find some of my quotes hilarious looking back at them, but I wouldn’t change my wording, except for my grammar, because what I said is exactly how I felt and still do feel. I am commenting on the “insane institution” bit when speaking about acting and social behavior in voice overs vs real life. If you want to read the whole thing you can on my site Ryan Satterfield in the news or in bigger print on the backstage site Ryan Satterfield is who got the part

There is a lot of stuff in “the works” right now, with no definitive yes or no, so I am not going to post what I am up too. The second I know definitely, I’ll let you know!

My first onscreen role– hey 14

Hey 14, an awesome music video made up of a ton of cool actors and an awesome band is now available to see on youtube. check out the Hey 14 Music Video.  I am highly biased about it,because I am in this video for two seconds and the credits. That day was quite an interesting day. I woke up at 4:30, got there at 7:00 and had a blast the rest of the day! Awesome catered lunch, awesome time with other actors, but now seeing the final product, well, it is totally cool! Hey 14 Music Video I am in :31 and :32 and I am listed in the credits.  Please comment and tell me what you think.

The art of screaming– Voice Over dying, being hit, shot, etc

What type of job would require you to need to know the art of screaming? Most people would say that screaming isn’t an art, but they are wrong. A scream can mean so many different things and in Voice Overs if you scream wrong it could cost you a gig or worse your voice. Don’t do the things listed below, they’re just food for thought. When you drop something on your foot you yell, scream or swear, but you do it with a different inflection then you would if you dropped a burning coal on your foot. When you are punched or kicked you scream or yell in a certain way. Well, Voice Over Actors get to have a fun time screaming, yelling, and dying in various ways all the time. Sometimes a session of dying, yelling and screaming can take three hours… that is a short session. Today I was working on an audition and was trying to get the right death scream down. When you scream so much, you shouldn’t scream from your throat, no you need to scream from your gut. These screams are also called guttural screams, yelling, dying, etc. Have the scream come from your stomach or use muscles in your body like your neck to make the scream sound realistic without using much of your throat. Honestly, I can’t think of another career that requires you to scream, yell and “die”.  Here are my five golden rules for Voice Over Screaming

1. Save your throat for talking, scream from your stomach or other muscles, also known as guttural screams, groans, dying, etc.

2. Don’t submit a weak scream or a scream that is totally out of context to what is happening to the character. If you are being hit you need the appropriate scream or yell.

3. Would you scream or yell that way in real life? If not, do it over again. There is an exception to this rule and that is with video games. You have to be way, way, way bigger than life when you die or get hit.

4. Have fun!!

5. Don’t drive your neighbors insane!

I did the Voice Overs for an iPhone game that is coming out sometime this year that was quite fun to record. I got to make the right sounds for my character being hit by cars, and then the right scream when his guts splatter all over the screen.

I hope you find this quick post that wasn’t written from my iPhone, at least somewhat helpful.

Become a voice over actor— not that simple.

I’ve seen people make voice over acting sound like a get quick rich scheme, make it sound super easy if you pay 600.00 for our training courses, none of this is true. First off, I love voice overs and acting. I am dedicated to my craft, but just like arts and crafts some people can do things that others can’t. I am not trying to say that you can’t be a voice over actor, no, I am saying that you may not be able to be a voice over actor. I am reiterating this, but if you want to read more about this true fact check out my post covering what voice overs aren’t.
Now that you’ve read that post lets discuss trying to Become a voice over actor. The most critical thing to a successful career— or any career for that matter is training. In voice overs it is called coaching. Before choosing a coach try to attend a workshop with them, before attending the workshop look at their imdb profile and see how much experience they have. It is important to note that not everything we do is put onto the imdb. I haven’t put any of the commercials or video game work I’ve done on there, but I will put the best work I’ve done on their soon. It is said that at least a year of coaching is  necessary before making the biggest step in your voice over career that can make or break you— recording your demo. Recording a demo is like a quarterback prepared to win the super bowl, if he goes out there with everything he’s got than he has a good chance of doing well, if he goes out there, but doesn’t know what a football even is, well I think you get my point. The same goes with voice overs, you need to know more than just what are voice overs, you need to know your pigeon hole, everything you can do within that hole and if you’re voice sounds good enough to compete with hundreds of thousands of other voice over actors. How many people are in the pigeon hole I am in? 5. This is so rare, that it basically doesn’t happen. That’s why their is only 5 of us.

You will need to get yourself good equipment. I recommend the blue snowball. It is 80 to 90 bucks and the results are really good. It is the most recommended microphone for voice over actors who are starting out. Now, what editing program do you have? Audacity is recommended by some in Hollywood—- but that’s cause it is free. If you want to get a gig don’t use audacity. Don’t get me wrong, it has it’s place, just not for pro voice overs. I’ve heard a few recordings and immediately think to myself “man they hired someone using audacity.” this program tries to remove background noise, but last time I checked it still wasn’t cutting it for pro grade use. I recommend you getting a 30 day FREE trial of adobe SoundBooth and book some gigs. So, this is a super basic look at becoming a voice over actor. There is no guarantee you’ll make it, you have to be really talented or have a real unique voice to really make it. That announcer voice does not sell anymore. Anyways I’ll post a More in-depth article later when I am not writing from my phone.